Library of Congress releases 11,700 freely usable photos of "roadside America," taken by John Margolies

9/3/2019 |  9872
  Published by Boing Boing

For decades, architectural critic and photographer John Margolies obsessively documented roadside attractions: vernacular architecture, weird sculpture, odd businesses and amusements. By his death in 2016, his collection consisted of more than 11,000 slides (he published books of his favorites, with annotations).

The Library of Congress purchased the Margolies archive and has released it to the public domain, with hi-rez scans of 11,710 slides.

Almost all of Margolies’ work was done in the interest of preserving images of what would otherwise be lost to time. Even his first book, published in 1981, was elegiacally called The End of the Road: Vanishing Highway Architecture in America. From the start, Margolies knew the quirky motels, miniature golf courses, diners, billboards, and gas stations were being endangered by franchising and changing fashions — not to mention changing patterns of automobile traffic. (For decades now, most drivers have, of course, opted for the high speed-limits of superhighways and the convenience of service areas, leaving the old local highways in the lurch.)

John Margolies’ Photographs of Roadside America [Public Domain Review]

John Margolies [Library of Congress]

Roadside America [Library of Congress/Flickr Commons]

(Thanks, @ridetheory!)


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